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British Interservices Judo Championships 2008. 


Today I headed over to Portsmouth for the Interservices Judo competition. The Interservices (for those of you not "down with the lingo" is a Judo competition where the Royal Navy (the hosts), Royal Airforce and the British Army compete.



As with all the interservice competitions, there is many many years of history and pride on the line. The day started with the traditional team events, kyu grades and dan grades. In the afternoon a more standard individual event insues.

There is also a points system by which each individual result adds to a service total. I confess i don't know quite how that worked. Nor what the final results were, I am sure the various service websites will have the results soon.

The interservices tournament is my favourite domestic event. By a long shot!

There is much to sell the event, great sense of importance being on a miltary base. Knowing that these matches have been happening for a long time. Also, it is only military personnel, so the level varies. This is very similar to the British Universities Judo event. Excluding people from attending is I thing something that all tournament organisers should consider.

That said, there are fulltime athletes and international level players attending. But this did not mean they had it easy. I saw several instances where a novice did amazingly well against the more serious athletes.

If I make a complaint, and yes of course there is a complaint coming, it's... the referees! There were some big errors and mistakes; but that's life. These things happen and sometimes they were corrected, though not often.


BUT my gripe for the day is this...
Just because a player lands on their side, this does not mean its a darn Yuko IMHO!
There were several instances of big throws ending with Uke landing (argueably) on their side and Tori only getting a Yuko. Then moments later some little knockdown got yuko too.

Maybe it's the "official interpretation" I'd like to know. But as I remember the rules, its a technique executed with force, speed, control where they land "mainly on the back" that scores Ippon. If one element is missing it is Wazari.

So, if they land on their side I would say that this is one missing element, so Wazari.


I got shouted at by "the table" when I shouted when someone was thrown in one of the bigger throws of the day (a standing Ippon Seoi) and only got Yuko. "They" stated it was because it was because he landed on his side.

Now maybe this is the official interpretation, though I doubt it and suspect it was just another instance of low level referees being... well low level and getting it wrong.

If it is the offical ruling on this, then it needs to change!

In the occasion I mentioned above, the player threw the opponent from full standing shoulder height. It was a lovely Ippon Seoi nage! The other guy hit the floor hard and fast! he was on his side, though I would argue that he was on back and side. So I saw a Wazari, but no.. Yuko!

If this is the "correct" ruling, then the rule absolutely needs changing and you, I and all of us need to fight to get it changed! It is unfair and bad for the sport! What motivation is there for me/you to try the big throw when it is substantially safer/easier to go for a lesser knockdown that lands them on their side.

What do you think?

Anyway, be sure to visit the various "services" websites:

http://www.rnjudo.com/
http://www.raf.mod.uk/rafjudo/
http://www2.army.mod.uk/sportandadventu ... /index.htm
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